The Sisters


We sisters two, we pretty ones,
We look like one another,
No two eggs look so alike,
No star so like the other.

We sisters two, we pretty ones,
We both have light brown hair,
And if 'twere braided together,
'twould all have but one color.

We sisters two, we pretty ones,
We wear matching dresses,
Go out walking in the fields
Hold hands when in choir.

We sisters two, we pretty ones,
We spin in earnest,
We sit at the same distaff,
We share the same bed.

O sisters two, you pretty ones,
How the tables have turned!
You love the same beau—
And here the song must end.



Translation: Charles L. Cingolani        Copyright © 2008







Die Schwestern


Wir Schwestern zwei, wir schoenen,
So gleich von Angesicht,
So gleicht kein Ei dem andern,
Kein Stern dem andern nicht.

Wir Schwestern zwei, wir schoenen,
Wir haben lichtbraune Haar,
Und flichtst du sie in einen Zopf,
Man kennt sie nicht fuerwahr.

Wir Schwestern zwei, wir schoenen,
Wir tragen gleich Gewand,
Spazieren auf dem Wiesenplan
Und singen Hand in Hand.

Wir Schwestern zwei, wir schoenen,
Wir spinnen in die Wett,
Wir sitzen an einer Kunkel,
Und schlafen in einem Bett.

O Schwestern zwei, ihr schoenen,
Wie hat sich das Blaettchen gewendt!
Ihr liebet einerlei Liebchen—
Und jetzt hat das Liedel ein End.



Eduard Moerike 1837
. . . Sisters, you can be sure of nothing! . . .
We know from one of Moerike's letters that he composed the poem one morning in bed: "when I
woke up it was as if it had made itself". The poem was immediately adopted as a folksong, which it
still is. Once Moerike heard it sung by his own parishioners, who had no idea that their parson had
written it.